Wednesday, August 3, 2011


Acupuncture involves the application of filaments (needles) piercing the skin at specific points, and in some cases, manipulating them into position. It must be performed by someone specifically trained in the field of acupuncture. Although the procedure may lead to visible results, it may not be the most pleasant process for those sensitive to touch. One time treatments yield short-term minimal results, therefore, a series of 8 to 12 treatments are needed for longer lasting results. Acupuncture works on the concept of balance, the yin and yang, which gives the skin an overall healthy glow, stimulates collagen, and minimizes fine lines.

Acupressure, on the other hand, is generally more pleasant and easily worked into a facial treatment. The theory of the meridians and acupressure points follows that of acupuncture without the application of needles. Acupressure involves the application of pressure on specific points to address detoxification, regeneration, elimination, improving energy flow, and enhancing the well being of the client and skin. It also requires specific training, but not the years of study required for acupuncture. Many estheticians incorporate some acupressure in their massage, some have been trained on specific points to address specific concerns, while others have been trained extensively enough to offer acupressure treatments designed to compliment the skincare plan and address the concerns of each client. For best results a series of treatments is recommended, 2 or 3 times a week for 10 to 12 treatments, depending on the desired outcome.

Acupuncture and acupressure can both offer results, however, acupressure is more common in the esthetic industry. Acupuncture is more popular in the para-medical, or medical field, and is most often used to address conditions or injuries that are more critical than aging. There are also some machines on the market that offer light therapy in combination with pressure point massage which intensify the results dramatically.